In the post-ward period, a new generation of potters emerged from the country’s long-established history of pottery-making. Without cutting their ties with traditions, these young potters explored the potential of pottery as an art. The creativity of 1950s French pottery ranged from the exhaltation of colour to the rigour of stoneware, from vehement sculptural forms to a quest for self-evident simplicity, from mass-production to one-off pieces. Its vitality and regained liberty reflected the birth of a new society. Traditional pottery-making practices adapted to a changing world and engaged with modern art, a decisive move initiated by Picasso at Vallauris, which revolutionized forms and techniques. The wealth and diversity of 1950s French pottery is illustrated by the careers of potters like Roger Capron, Jean Derval, Elisabeth Joulia and Suzanne Ramié among them.

Ceramic, France, 1950, H 12 L 32 cm

Ceramic, France, 1950, H 12 L 32 cm

Ceramic vase, Accolay, France 1950. H 64.5 DIA 32 cm

Ceramic vase, Accolay, France 1950. H 64.5 DIA 32 cm

Cubist ceramic, 1940, L 16 W 16 H 38 cm

Cubist ceramic, 1940, L 16 W 16 H 38 cm

Vallauris ceramic vase, France, 1965, H 50 cm

Vallauris ceramic vase, France, 1965, H 50 cm

Ceramic by Suzanne Tison, France, 1960, H 45 cm

Ceramic by Suzanne Tison, France, 1960, H 45 cm