The pottery of Accolay is the production of a community of potters settled in the village of Accolay, in the Department of Yonne, in France. This production center was established by four former students of Alexandre Kostanda, a famous ceramist.

Active from 1945 to 1983, their pottery is characterized by a great technical inventiveness and an extremely abundant production. The community of potters exploited the proximity of the “national 6” road and invested the petrol stations to make permanent places of exhibitions. Their exhibition building, inspired by the constructions of the “24 heures du Mans” circuit, became the required stop of holidaymakers in transit.

Ceramic figures with wire frame were among the most representative pieces produced by Accolay studios. The leader of the team of the Accolay potters, André Boutaud, passionate of chess, produced many pieces of game using this technique. The blue vases and pottery they produced were inspired by ancient ceramics found in Bourgogne. A wide range of ceramic works were covered with graphics inspired by ethnic art from South America. Alongside these pieces were created masks recalling traditional African art.

All pottery of Accolay has a signature, sometimes with a stamp, and for some pieces, initials of the Potter. The oldest pieces sometimes include the double A (homophone of “A colles”).

Ceramic vase, Accolay, France 1950. H 64.5 DIA 32 cm

Ceramic vase, Accolay, France 1950. H 64.5 DIA 32 cm

Accolay Ceramic Vase, 1950, France, H 34 cm

Accolay Ceramic Vase, 1950, France, H 34 cmA